Currawinya National Park Currawinya National Park

Currawinya National Park was gazetted in 1991and 1991 is a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. This 151,300 hectare park features two large bodies of water - Lake Numalla, freshwater, and Lake Wyara, a salt lake.

These lakes are important breeding and refuge sites for a spectacular array of waterbirds, including waders migrating from across Australia and the world.

Currawinya's wetlands regularly support up to 100 000 waterbirds. Of particular importance are lakes Numalla and Wyara, no other wetland complex in arid or southern Australia is thought to consistently support such large populations of waterbirds.

Separated by only a few kilometres of sand dunes, each has different water conditions. Lake Numalla receives floodwaters more frequently from the Paroo River and is usually permanent. It holds fresh water, while the slightly larger Lake Wyara is saline and regularly dries to a vast, white claypan. Different bird communities live on each of the lakes at different times. Lake Wyara supports a greater number of waterbirds while Lake Numalla has a greater diversity.

The Greater Bilby has disappeared from nearly 90% of its former range in Queensland. An ambitious project to re-introduce the bilby to parts of its former range is being conducted within the Bulloo Shire at Currawinya National Park. Make an effort to visit Currawinya, marvel in its natural beauty and find

out about the community bilby project.

Finding Currawinya

  • Near Hungerford on the Queensland/New South Wales border, all access roads to Currawinya are unsealed and impassable when wet. A 4WD vehicle is recommended.
  • From Cunnamulla, drive 70 km south·west to Eulo, then a further 4 km west before turning south towards Hungerford. The final 97 km to the park office takes 1-1.5 hours to drive.
  • From the south, enter the park via Hungerford, 217 km north-west of Bourke. The park office is 20 km northof Hungerford.

Things to do in Currawinya

  • Drive to the Lakes
  • Walk to The Granites
  • Visit Heritage Sites - Currawinya has a large number of sites significant to Aboriginal people.
  • Visit Heritage Places - Relics of the pastoral occupation since the 1860s are scattered throughout the park. The old Caiwarro Homestead site is of particular interest to heritage enthusiasts. Here the remains of numerous buildings, machinery and a levee bank create a picture of life in the past.
  • Fishing is permitted along the Paroo River and in selected areas of Lake Numalla. Only live bait caught within the Paroo River system can be brought into the park.
  • Canoeing, kayaking and swimming are permitted on Lake Numalla; however motorised boats and jet skis are not permitted on either of the lakes.

Top Image: Birds  Currawinya lakes, courtesy Kilcowera Station.

              

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